Lyric Soprano

Reviews

“…the evening really belonged to the two female leads [in “La Bohème]… Last season, Vicari gave a masterful performance as Cìo-cìo San in Lancaster Opera Company’s “Madame Butterfly.” Thursday night, she again triumphed as the frail catalyst… her warm, full-bodied lyric soprano held a poignant sound, hopeful and tragic at turns… In the third act…her aria…brought a lump to this reviewer’s throat.”

Marichelle Roque-Lutz
Intelligencer Journel



“Laura Antonina Vicari (Thursday’s Mimì) captured the requisite fragility, sweetness and vulnerability...”

Mary Alice Bitts
Sunday News



“There are two words to describe Thursday evening at the Fulton Opera House: exquisite and inspired. The music, the sets, the lighting…and Laura Vicari [as Cìo-Cìo-San].  …the petite, slender singer moved with the grace of a dancer. Her form, her face, her every gesture… Puccini’s music for his young heroine needs a singer with a voice of some heft and excellent vocal technique, both of which Vicari possesses.”

Marichelle Roque-Lutz
Intelligencer Journel



“...a terrific Cìo-Cìo-San in soprano Laura Vicari... Vicari has a powerful voice and she also fit the part dramatically. I felt for her emotionally while I marveled at her voice. For me that makes an opera richer and more enjoyable.”

Jane Holahan
New Era



“In “One Fine Day (Un Bel Dì Vedremo),” the opera’s best known aria, the rich, vibrant voice of Laura Vicari was postitively heartbreaking as she carries on her faithful vigil in hopes that Pinkerton will return to her.”

Laura Knowles
Sunday News



“Laura Antonina Vicari as Fiordiligi, suggests one part Carol Burnett, one part Imogene Coca, another part Millie Helper…she lights up the stage with an array of facial muggings, reacting to even the slightest suggestion of impropriety as if the devil himself had made it. But when, in the end, she is unable to resist temptation, she reveals the woman inside… She scaled her daunting arias quite convincingly… Throughout the evening her phrasing had a particularly vital spark.”

Tim Smith
The Baltimore Sun



“I felt that the two Choruses [in The Rape of Lucretia] were head and shoulders the stars of the show…they were so clear in their music and diction, and so completely realized dramatically, that you could not take your eyes or ears off them. [With Laura Vicari] there was an extra dimension of acting – of singing acting – that was utterly astounding, and made me very proud to have had anything to do with helping her develop that astonishing quality as a performer.”

Roger Brunyate
Director of the Peabody Opera Theatre



“Vicari has a beautiful voice and convincingly conveys a range of emotions. Refreshingly free of vanity, Vicari seems a genuine ensemble player, who instills confidence in less-experienced colleagues… As Nedda, Vicari delivered the evening’s high point of emotional intensity and passion… Nedda’s restrained longing, rose to a soaring passion before reaching a steamy conclusion… As the shy Marguerite, [Vicari] conveyed a sweet lightness that melted into lyricism…”

Mary Johnson
The Baltimore Sun



“Ms. Vicari’s ability to convince through actions and movements is well-known to Annapolis Opera goers. Her ‘Deh, vieni non tardar’…and her part in the Nedda / Silvio duet…were no exception.”

J.F. Greene

The Capital



“Ms. Vicari was easily able to handle the differing musical styles and requirements without difficulty. Her portrayals of Marguerite, Juliette, and Manon were appropriately and convincingly varied from character to character… As Manon, she was coquettish but ardent.”

J.F. Greene
The Capital



“Vicari’s voice has great clarity and beauty that takes on the color appropriate to the role. It was light and lyrical as Gounod’s Juliette; full and soaring as Massenet’s Manon or Gounod’s Marguerite.”

Mary Johnson
The Baltimore Sun